Master’s Degree in Forensic Psychology @ University of Denver

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width=”259″ height=”195″ />After having reviewed the five fully online masters programs in forensic psychology, numerous requests were received for more information on the campus-based masters programs in forensic psychology that are available. Thus, this series of articles will review each of the masters programs in forensic psychology and provide information on each program in a similar format so as to assist in comparisons between the various options

The goal of this series of articles is simply to provide information in a consistent format to assist those individuals who are considering an education in forensic psychology and not to convince anyone to attend a particular program. Having been a professor in this field for the last 13 years I am familiar at some level with almost every forensic psychology program available in North America. Many undergraduate students are not familiar with all the possible options and so this series will lay them out in a consistent format for ease of comparison.

Masters Degree in Forensic Psychology –University of Denver

Program Description

From the website: Our mission is to provide comprehensive education and training relevant to the application of psychological theory, knowledge, skills, and competencies to the civil and criminal justice systems.

The Master of Arts in forensic psychology was first offered at the GSPP in 1999 in response to the growing interest in the rapidly developing field of forensic psychology. The degree supplements fundamental master’s level clinical psychology training with course work and practicum experiences in the area of psychology and law. The Masters Degree in forensic psychology concerns the application of psychological theory, knowledge, skills and competencies to the civil and criminal justice systems. It is designed to train students to become mental health professionals, able to work in a variety of clinical settings within the criminal and civil legal system, including but not limited to: adult, juvenile and child populations; victim assistance; police consultation; correctional institutions; domestic violence and child abuse programs; and trial consulting.

Specializations

The Masters in Forensic Psychology is a clinically-oriented degree and students are expected to engage in practical application of their learned skills through field placements in a variety of forensic settings. No specializations, per se, exist in this program and all students are expected to take the same general sequence of coursework.

Credits

The program website does not appear to specify how many credits are required for this Masters program. It states that the degree is completed over a 2-year period.

Thesis

It does not appear that completing a thesis is an option in this program. The program was designed to prepare masters-level clinicians for work in a variety of forensic settings.

Externship/Practicum

Students are required to complete field placements as part of their clinical training. At least two field placements appear to be required.

Admission Requirements

A Bachelor’s degree is required for admission to the Masters program. If the student did not major in psychology as an undergraduate, 4 psychology courses are required (these are recommended: abnormal psychology, child psychology, experimental psychology, personality theory) as is a statistics course. This requirement can also be met by obtaining a score of 660 or higher on the Psychology Subject GRE.

All applicants must submit GRE scores. “The school expects an undergraduate grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.5 and a graduate GPA of 3.0. Higher scores may make an application more competitive.”

Tuition & Fees

The University of Denver has one of the most difficult websites to navigate and it is difficult to find straightforward answers to simple questions such as “How much is this degree going to cost me?” I was unable to find how many credit hours the Masters degree is comprised of but could ascertain that students were expected to attend the program for 2 full-time years, which appears to be 3 “quarters” a year. I was unable to find different rates for in-state and out-of-state residents so assume that the cost of a graduate education is the same for both (as it is at most other institutions).

In-State Residents

$12,312 per quarter (students attend three quarters in a calendar year) = $36, 936/year (the Masters degree is a 2-year program)

Out-of-State Residents

$12,312 per quarter (students attend three quarters in a calendar year) = $36, 936/year (the Masters degree is a 2-year program)

Coursework

Again, this was a difficult site to navigate and did not include a lot of specific information. The site includes a list of courses but does not contain any course numbers or credit hours. The courses are described and listed by year in the program.

Typical First-Year Courses

Professionalism and Practice I (First-Year Case Conference)

Introduction to Clinical Interviewing and Psychotherapy

Forensic Mental Health: The Basics (Forensic Psychology I)

Forensic Mental Health: The Front LinesLaw Enforcement and Correctional Psychology (Forensic Psychology II)

Forensic Mental Health: Risky Business (Forensic Psychology III)

Group Interventions

Statistics

Research Methods

Issues in Measurement

Adult Psychopathology and Diagnosis

Trauma and Crisis Intervention

Profiles in Crime: The Psychology of Criminal Behavior

Conflict Resolution in Forensic Practice and Real Life

Typical Second-Year Courses

Professionalism and Practice II (Second-Year Case Conference)

Ethical Issues in Forensic Psychology

Cognitive Assessment

Self Report Assessment

Projective Assessment

Sociocultural Issues in Forensic Psychology

Family Law

Mental Health Law

Evaluation and Treatment of the Juvenile Offender

Evaluation and Treatment of the Adult Offenders

Cognitive Behavioral Interventions

Substance Abuse: Theory and Treatment

Criminal Evaluations

Concluding Comments

The website for this program is perhaps one of the most difficult to navigate and therefore one of the least informative that I have seen. No specific answers to simple and important questions, such as “How much is this going to cost?” “How many courses am I required to take?” “What is the sequence of coursework?” or “How many credits do I need to earn?” were provided. Given that almost every other program in this area provides at least this information to prospective students, I wonder why this is not a priority for this particular program. If anyone from the University of Denver happens to read this post, please fill out the comments section below if you can provide me with some of the answers to these questions. If you are a student considering this program, I strongly advise you to contact the program director to find out the answers to these and other relevant questions.

What is clear is that this is a clinically oriented program that is intended to prepare students for work as masters-level clinicians and not necessarily for further study at the doctoral level. Students considering this program will want to inquire about whether the state in which they intend to reside licenses master’s level clinicians in psychology. Although the website indicates that 29% of their graduates go on to doctoral programs, I suspect that those individuals have sought out other opportunities for research while in the program. As the program is described, there does not appear to be a required research component.

Forensic Psychology Salary and Employment Prospects for 2012 and Beyond

Money in hand

Forensic psychology is an intriguing field of work and study but two of the most important questions to ask before deciding to pursue any field of work or study is whether there will be employment opportunities available when you complete the requisite educational requirements and whether the expected salary is enough for you to live. This article describes the current state of employment and salary prospects for forensic psychologists for 2012 and beyond.

Employment Prospects for Forensic Psychologists

In a nutshell, employment prospects for forensic psychologists are great. The United States Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that career employment for forensic psychologists is expected to grow by about 15% through 2016. Not only is this a faster growth rate than average but it is also one of the fastest growing fields within the broader domain of psychology.

Those who currently work in the field know that there is a dearth of forensic psychologists in the correctional system and that it would take hiring thousands of forensic psychologists to make up for the shortfall in this area. Thus, the correctional system throughout the United States will likely be one of the largest employers of new forensic psychologists over the next decade.

Academic institutions, research institutions, and think tanks are also expected to hire a number of forensic psychologists over the next decade. As more and more national attention is directed towards the successful reintegration of offenders back into the community, additional resources, including the retention of forensic psychologists in both practice and research settings, are expected to be directed towards this goal.

Although a doctoral-level degree is the requirement to practice as an independent psychologist is most every state, certain states, such as New York, are revising their licensing laws to allow masters-level individuals to become licensed as counselors thereby increasing the employment opportunities for those who do not hold doctoral-level degrees. These changes are a result of the strong need for psychological service providers in these states. Thus, employment prospects tend to be good for both doctoral and masters-level practitioners.

Salary Prospects for Forensic Psychologists

The salary that one earns as a forensic psychologist is typically dependant upon the level of education (typically doctoral vs. master’s level), the type of setting in which one is employed (e.g., correctional institution, academic institution, community mental health center, forensic hospital, private practice), and the number of years of experience in the field. Other factors may include geographic location, with higher salaries typically associated with larger cities and more densely populated areas.

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics indicates that the mean annual salary for forensic psychologists is $86,510, with a range from $41,200 to $119,940. These are aggregated data that do not take into consideration the number of years of experience of the individual.

The American Psychological Association’s Practice Organization, which includes individuals who are licensed as psychologists and who are actively engaged in the practice of psychology, surveyed their members as to their annual gross income from work as a psychologist and found the following:

Salary Range Percentage of Respondents
Less than $30,000 4.9%
$30,000 – $59,999 12.8%
$60,000 – $99,999 36.7%
$100,000 – $150,000 28.5%
More than $150,000 11.8%

This represents the salary earned across all subtypes of psychology; however, forensic psychologists typically make more than most other types of psychologists so it is probably safe to assume that these numbers are a bit on the conservative side for the subspecialty of forensic psychology.

For those who are interested in some state-specific information from the Bureau of Labor Statistics about the salaries of forensic psychologists, please see this article on the typical forensic psychology salary.

For those who are interested in some setting-specific information on the salaries of forensic psychologists, including academic and research settings, clinical settings, legal settings, correctional settings, and private practice, please see this article.

All things considered, the time is right for forensic psychologists. This is an interesting field with a lot of upside for employment and salary, not to mention rewarding work that is often intellectually stimulating and intriguing.

If this is your first visit to this website, please have a look around as there are a number of good articles on education and training in forensic psychology, career profiles of various types of forensic psychologists, and salary and employment information as well as resources for those already working in the field. Enjoy!

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Master’s Degree in Forensic Psychology @ Marymount University

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After having reviewed the five fully online masters programs in forensic psychology, numerous requests were received for more information on the campus-based masters programs in forensic psychology that are available. Thus, this series of articles will review each of the masters programs in forensic psychology and provide information on each program in a similar format so as to assist in comparisons between the various options.

The goal of this series of articles is simply to provide information in a consistent format to assist those individuals who are considering an education in forensic psychology and not to convince anyone to attend a particular program. Having been a professor in this field for the last 13 years I am familiar at some level with almost every forensic psychology program available in North America. Many undergraduate students are not familiar with all the possible options and so this series will lay them out in a consistent format for ease of comparison.

Masters Degree in Forensic Psychology – Marymount University

Program Description

From the website: Marymount University has been a leader in preparing individuals to be part of one of the most sought-after career fields today – forensic psychology.

Marymount was the first Washington, DC, area university to offer the Master of Arts in Forensic Psychology. And you can capitalize on the University’s alliances and proximity to key agencies important to study in this field – organizations such as the FBI, NCIS, the Supreme Court, the U.S. Department of Justice, and the Virginia Department of Juvenile Justice. MU integrates the resources of such agencies through site visits, courtroom observations, field research, internships, and distinguished speakers.

The discipline of forensic psychology is concerned with the application of psychological knowledge to the juvenile, civil, and criminal justice systems. Marymount’s Forensic Psychology program is interdisciplinary and combines study in sociology, criminal justice, and public policy, in addition to the many subfields of psychology. It addresses questions of value, such as how best to achieve fairness and justice in the American adversarial legal system, as well as empirical issues such as the origins of criminal behavior, problems with eyewitness testimony, evaluation of threats against public figures, personalities of political leaders, the origins of terrorism, evaluation and treatment of offenders and their victims, and the effectiveness of trial consultation. Each course incorporates an ethics component to encourage you to grapple with the extremely complicated issues involved in a career in forensic psychology.

Specializations

No concentrations are available. All students take the same series of courses (2 of which are electives for the student to choose).

Credits

The program consists of 39 credits (13 courses, including an internship experience in forensic psychology).

Thesis

Not required. It does not appear that completing a thesis is an option in this program; however, it appears that there are research opportunities available for those students who desire this experience.

Externship/Practicum

Required. Students must complete a pass/fail internship experience in forensic psychology, which consists of 300 hours (270 hours on site and 30 hours in the classroom).

Admission Requirements

Applicants must have a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university and must submit their GRE scores.

Tuition & Fees

In-State Residents

$770/credit

Out-of-State Residents

$770/credit (additional fees may apply for International Students)

Coursework

Required Coursework (39 credits)

PS 500 Research and Evaluation
PS 501 Bases of Psychopathology
PS 507 Social Psychology of Aggression
PS 517 Neuropsychological Issues, Treatments, and Assessments
PS 580 Foundations of Forensic Psychology
PS 581 Psychology and the Law
PS 582 Advanced Issues in Forensic Psychology
PS 584 Psychology of Criminal Behavior or SOC 507 Juvenile Justice
PS 585 Forensic Assessment
PS 599F Internship: Forensic Psychology
SOC 510 Theories of Social Deviance

One of the following:

CE 508 Crisis Intervention
CE 509 Substance Abuse Assessment and Intervention

One of the following:

CE 524 Theories and Techniques of Family Counseling
CE 551 Multicultural Counseling
CJ 501 Victims of Interpersonal Violence
CJ 508 Principles of Forensic Science I
CJ 509 Principles of Forensic Science II: Advanced Criminalistics
LA 500 Introduction to the Legal System
LA 590 Supervising Legal Research and Writing
LA 591 Advanced Legal Research and Writing/Computerized Legal Research
PS 529 Psychopathology of Childhood and Adolescence
PS 583 Psychology and Treatment of the Juvenile Offender
PS 586 Field Experience in Criminal Court
PS 587 Psychology, Social Policy, and Law
PS 588 Police Psychology
PS 589 Behavioral Criminology
PS 590 Issues in Criminal Assessment and Investigation
PS 591 Child Victimization
PS 592 Foundations of Political Psychology
PS 598 Project
SOC 507 Juvenile Justice
PS 584 Psychology of Criminal Behavior

Concluding Comments

The website also indicates that students in this program have the opportunity to: study abroad, in collaboration with the Forensic Psychology program at London Metropolitan University (a course is offered during alternating summers for select Marymount students); participate in ongoing research through an agreement with the FBI’s Behavioral Science Unit; earn a second degree in Clinical Mental Health Counseling and begin the supervised experience necessary for licensure as a licensed professional counselor (LPC); and land an internship or job with a regionally or nationally recognized agency or continue further study.

This masters program is intended to prepare students for work in forensic settings. While there does not appear to be a strong emphasis on research in this program, students who are interested in conducting research can take advantage of Marymount’s ties and connections with various agencies for this purpose. Those students who are interested in becoming licensed masters-level clinicians can do so through the Clinical Mental Health Counseling program, but not the Forensic Psychology program. The program offers fieldwork to provide an opportunity for students to develop practical skills. Those students who desire to continue their education at the doctoral level are advised to either select a different masters program with an emphasis on research training (preferred) or to take advantage of every opportunity to conduct research and take research methods and statistics courses while in this masters program.

Master’s Degree in Forensic Psychology @ Holy Names University

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ent/uploads/2011/11/holynames.jpg” alt=”” width=”127″ height=”96″ />After having reviewed the five fully online masters programs in forensic psychology, numerous requests were received for more information on the campus-based masters programs in forensic psychology that are available. Thus, this series of articles will review each of the masters programs in forensic psychology and provide information on each program in a similar format so as to assist in comparisons between the various options.

The goal of this series of articles is simply to provide information in a consistent format to assist those individuals who are considering an education in forensic psychology and not to convince anyone to attend a particular program. Having been a professor in this field for the last 13 years I am familiar at some level with almost every forensic psychology program available in North America. Many undergraduate students are not familiar with all the possible options and so this series will lay them out in a consistent format for ease of comparison.

Masters Degree in Forensic Psychology – Holy Names University

Program Description

From the website: Holy Names University offers six graduate programs in the Counseling Psychology Programs for persons who want to work professionally as counselors in a variety of venues, including forensic and pastoral. Students will gain the knowledge and skills necessary to effectively counsel, fully acknowledging the diverse dimensions of people’s lives. The faculty is made up of practicing clinicians, and students are exposed to a wide variety of counseling theories with an integrated, programmatic emphasis on human diversity and spirituality. Classes incorporate didactic learning with opportunities for experiential practice via written exercises, case studies, and simulations. Integration of learning is fostered by scholarly papers and reflection journals. At the end of the program, students will be able to demonstrate clinical competence and clear understanding of professional responsibilities.

Our students reflect a rich diversity of age, culture, religion, lifestyles, and lived experiences. Holy Names Counseling programs are appropriate for individuals whose own levels of personal and psychological development enable them to have high regard for all human beings, especially those different from themselves. All programs are dedicated to fostering student development of openness and respect for all people. We firmly believe that valuing differences is a hallmark of effective, compassionate counseling. All three programs are designed for the working adult. Most classes are offered in the late afternoons and evenings.

Master of Arts in Forensic Psychology (30 units)

This program, designed for those who may be licensed, prepares professionals for a career in working with victims and perpetrators in a correctional setting. This program is uniquely based in a foundational philosophy of restorative justice. Students will gain theoretical knowledge of the counseling field as it relates to corrections and the legal system, in general. Students completing this program are not eligible for state licensure as Marriage and Family therapists.

Specializations

No concentrations are available. All students take the same series of courses.

Credits

The program consists of 30 credit units.

Designed for the working adult, most classes are offered late afternoons and evenings, Mondays and Wednesdays or Tuesdays and Thursdays. Some Saturday classes are required.

Thesis

Not required. It does not appear that completing a thesis is an option in this program.

Externship/Practicum

Not required. Students do not have the option for an externship or field placement in this program. The website and brochure materials indicate that this Masters program is intended for the working adult and for those who may be licensed clinicians. The intent of this program is to provide a foundation of knowledge for working with clients in forensic settings. Students who do not have clinical experience may be interested in completing the dual MA degree in Counseling and Forensic Psychology.

Admission Requirements

Applicant to any counseling psychology master’s program must have taken an undergraduate general psychology or sociology course or have life experience working in the community mental health field.

From the website: Applicants must meet the following minimum requirements: (1) A bachelor’s degree or its equivalent, conferred by an accredited institution of higher education. (2) An undergraduate record that is satisfactory in terms of quality of scholarship. A scholarship average of 2.7 is required for the total undergraduate program, with an average of 3.0 in the major and in any subsequent graduate work.

The GRE does not appear to be required.

Tuition & Fees

In-State Residents

$800/unit

Out-of-State Residents

$800/unit

Coursework

Required Coursework (30 units)

CPSY 200 Foundations of Counseling: Process and Skills
CPSY 206 Forensic Psychology and the Law
CPSY 207 Psychology of Criminal Behavior
CPSY 208 Substance Abuse Assessment & Treatment
CPSY 209A Assessment, Diagnosis, & Treatment of the Victim
CPSY 209B Assessment, Diagnosis, & Treatment of the Offender
CPSY 211 Forensics: Psychometrics and Assessment
CPSY 212 Forensic Psychology Professional Practice Seminar
CPSY 226 Advanced Issues in Correctional and Community Counseling
CPSY 230 Human Diversity in Counseling
CPSY 245D Domestic Violence Assessment and Treatment

Concluding Comments

This masters program is intended to prepare students for working with victims and perpetrators. It is geared towards those students who have undergraduate degrees in psychology and who are currently working in the field but who would like more knowledge and skill for working various legal and correctional settings. The program is geared towards the working adult who is already licensed and does not lead to licensure eligibility. Those students who are not licensed or who require clinical experience should consider the dual MA degree in Counseling Psychology and Forensic Psychology as the dual program offers practical experience whereas this program does not. Given the limited fieldwork involved in this program, it does not appear to be the most appropriate program for those with no experience working with clients or patients in a psychological or counseling capacity. In addition, this program does not emphasize research and provides no opportunity to conduct research; therefore, those desiring to continue on to doctoral-level training in psychology are advised against taking this masters degree program. This program appears to offer an important knowledge base for those students and licensed clinicians whose work will require them to provide services to victims and perpetrators in a variety of forensic settings.

Master’s Degree in Forensic Psychology @ Fairleigh Dickinson University

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content/uploads/2011/11/fairleigh.jpg” alt=”” width=”104″ height=”104″ />After having reviewed the five fully online masters programs in forensic psychology, numerous requests were received for more information on the campus-based masters programs in forensic psychology that are available. Thus, this series of articles will review each of the masters programs in forensic psychology and provide information on each program in a similar format so as to assist in comparisons between the various options.

The goal of this series of articles is simply to provide information in a consistent format to assist those individuals who are considering an education in forensic psychology and not to convince anyone to attend a particular program. Having been a professor in this field for the last 13 years I am familiar at some level with almost every forensic psychology program available in North America. Many undergraduate students are not familiar with all the possible options and so this series will lay them out in a consistent format for ease of comparison.

Masters Degree in Forensic Psychology – Fairleigh Dickinson University

Program Description

From the website: Although many forensic psychologists are academics who teach and do research, most are full-time practitioners. Forensic psychologists are, essentially, clinicians trained to conduct specialized evaluations for the courts and testify as expert witnesses. The evaluations that the courts may request vary widely, ranging from criminal responsibility, diminished capacity and competency to child custody, disability, personal injury, death penalty mitigation, malingering, and violence / dangerousness risk.

Masters-level forensic psychologists will not, for the most part, be assigned to conduct these evaluations, although they may assist under the supervision a doctoral-level forensic psychologist. Masters-level forensic psychologists most frequently are employed as clinicians who conduct therapy with forensic clients, either in forensic settings (e.g., jails, prisons, locked forensic units in state hospitals) or in the community with probationers or parolees. Masters-level forensic psychologists are also employed to do research with a variety of justice-related agencies and organizations. As noted, masters-level forensic psychologists may also be hired by court clinics or private practitioners to assist with evaluations under the supervision of a licensed psychologist.

Our program at Fairleigh Dickinson University is designed to offer our students the maximum possible exposure to the broad field of forensic psychology while at the same time streamlining a curriculum that allows students to finish in 18 months. Students are exposed through coursework to all of the aforementioned areas of forensic psychology practice. In addition, students gain invaluable clinical experience through the completion of a 300-hour externship placement, and have the option to participate in forensic research and do a thesis.

Specializations

No concentrations are available. All students take the same series of courses and 2 electives.

Credits

The program consists of 36 credit hours, which the student takes over the course of 1 ½ years.

Thesis

Not required. Students have the option to participate in research and complete a thesis.

Externship/Practicum

Required. Students complete a 300-hour externship placement as a requirement of the program.

Admission Requirements

Students are required to have completed an undergraduate degree in psychology or a related field from an accredited institution of higher education (including coursework in Introductory Psychology, Statistics, and Abnormal Psychology) and must submit their scores from the general test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). The website does not provide any information regarding average or minimum GRE scores or GPA.

Tuition & Fees

In-State Residents

$1075/credit hour

Out-of-State Residents

$1075/credit hour

Coursework

Required Coursework (36 credits; the following + 2 electives)

PSYC6121 Statistics and Research Methods

PSYC6114 Psychopathology

PSYC6230 Introduction to Forensic Psychology

PSYC6231 Psychological Basis of Criminal Behavior

PSYC7235 Evaluating Criminal Responsibility & Competency to Stand Trial

PSYC7230 Forensic Evaluation & Assessment

PSYC7130 Forensic Interviewing Techniques

PSYC6227 Clinical Practice in Forensic Contexts

PSYC7234 Ethical Issues in Forensic Psychology

Externship and Proseminar

Concluding Comments

This is a relatively short (fewer than usual credit hours) and relatively expensive (higher tuition per credit hour than most) masters program that appears mainly geared towards those students who wish to be involved in the delivery of psychological services to those in the correctional or forensic mental health systems. The focus on assessment appears relatively strong whereas interventions and other treatment methods are less emphasized. There does not appear to be a strong research focus in this program but the materials do note that a thesis is optional and is recommended for those students who would like to pursue doctoral-level study in psychology. It is unclear whether the thesis work would substitute for the externship requirement or some other part of the curriculum or would be completed in addition to the regular curriculum. Students interested in doctoral-level study in forensic psychology might wish to consider a more research-focused masters program.

Master’s Degree in Forensic Psychology @ The College of Saint Elizabeth

College of St. Elizabeth

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ent/uploads/2011/11/stelizabeth.jpg” alt=”” width=”120″ height=”120″ />After having reviewed the five fully online masters programs in forensic psychology, numerous requests were received for more information on the campus-based masters programs in forensic psychology that are available. Thus, this series of articles will review each of the masters programs in forensic psychology and provide information on each program in a similar format so as to assist in comparisons between the various options.

The goal of this series of articles is simply to provide information in a consistent format to assist those individuals who are considering an education in forensic psychology and not to convince anyone to attend a particular program. Having been a professor in this field for the last 13 years I am familiar at some level with almost every forensic psychology program available in North America. Many undergraduate students are not familiar with all the possible options and so this series will lay them out in a consistent format for ease of comparison.

Masters Degree in Forensic Psychology – The College of Saint Elizabeth

Program Description

From the website: The M.A. in Forensic Psychology and Counseling program is a 48-credit, cohort-based program offered over a 2-1⁄2 year time frame. By offering a solid curriculum that focuses on counseling, evaluation and treatment, the program prepares graduates for a career in providing counseling services to those involved in the criminal justice system.

The mission of the program is to provide graduates with the skills and knowledge they need to provide effective, high quality mental health counseling and evaluation services in a variety of forensic settings. By building on the strong curriculum and success established in the Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology the program will balance traditional knowledge of counseling with the understanding, evaluation, and treatment of adult and juvenile offenders, as well as the victims of crime and domestic violence. The curriculum would prepare graduates to work in a number of settings such as juvenile detention centers, secure forensic units in state facilities, community mental health centers, jails/prison, probation services, court service units, protective services, violence risk assessment, and specialized agencies such as child advocacy centers.

Specializations

No concentrations are available. The program is a Masters in Forensic Psychology and Counseling.

Credits

The program consists of 48 credit hours, which the student takes over the course of 2 ½ years. The curriculum consists of 24 credit hours that are shared with the Masters in Counseling Psychology program as well as 21 credits of Forensic Psychology courses and a 3-credit course in Justice Studies.

Thesis

Not required.

Externship/Practicum

Required. Students complete both a practicum and field experience in counseling psychology.

Admission Requirements

From the website: Graduate programs in Psychology are coeducational. Applicants must have a baccalaureate degree, with a minimum of 12 credits in psychology, which includes:

  • General Psychology
  • Developmental Psychology (Child Development, Adolescent Development, Adult Development or Life Span Development course)
  • Theories of Personality and Psychopathology (Abnormal Psychology)
  • Elementary Statistics and Experimental Psychology are prerequisite courses for PSY 63: Research Methods and Advanced Statistics

The baccalaureate degree must be from an accredited undergraduate institution with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher (on a 4.0 scale).

Students will be invited for an interview based on their academic achievement, letters of reference, personal statement and relevant experiences. The interview will include a case review and a standardized personality assessment. Transfer of credit into the graduate program will be subject to evaluation and approval by the program director.

All graduate transfer credits must carry a minimum GPA of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale). A maximum of 10 transfer credits will be accepted for the master’s in counseling psychology program.

The GRE is not required.

Tuition & Fees

In-State Residents

$899/credit hour

Out-of-State Residents

$899/credit hour

Coursework

Core Coursework shared with Counseling Psychology (24 credits)

PSY 620 The Helping Relationship in Counseling

PSY 631 Research Methods and Advanced Statistics

PSY 633 Counseling Theories and Methods I

PSY 637 Group Dynamics and Interpersonal Communication

PSY 641 Psychopathology and Diagnosis

PSY 651 Substance Abuse Counseling

PSY 671 Counseling Theories III: Practicum

PSY 691 Counseling Theories IV: Field Experience

PSY 699 Culminating Project

Core Coursework in Forensic Psychology (21 credits)

PSY 621 Introduction to Forensic Psychology

PSY 622 Violence and risk assessment

PSY 623 Trauma and Crisis Intervention

PSY 624 Psychological Assessment for Forensic Psychology I:

PSY 625 Psychological Assessment for Forensic

PSY 626 Evaluation and treatment of Juvenile Offenders

PSY 627 Evaluation and treatment of Adult Offenders

PSY 628 The Social Psychology of Crime and Criminal Behavior

Core Coursework in Justice Studies (3 credits)

JUS 620 Law and Legal Systems

Concluding Comments

The College of Saint Elizabeth offers a Masters in Forensic Psychology and Counseling program that prepares students to work in various forensic and criminal justice settings, providing a variety of psychological services. The website does not provide any information regarding whether this program is licensure-eligible; however, a review of the curriculum suggests that students who complete this program may be eligible to apply for masters-level licensure in counseling psychology in those states that offer this level of licensure. The program is practice-oriented, as opposed to having a strong emphasis on research, so those students thinking about completing a masters program as an entree into doctoral-level study are advised to consider other programs with a stronger emphasis on research and that require a thesis.